Planning a Memorial for Your Protagonist

As we journey through life we encounter many people in many different circumstances. At work we have a business persona that’s built around the job requirements. We behave differently at the gym, bowling alley, bar or tennis courts, where we are able to relax and talk about personal interests. At church we follow the lead of our pastor, minister, or rabbi in terms of how we act during and after the service. At home we have family to consider.  

            In all these situations we present ourselves differently and so we will be remembered differently after we’ve passed away. Some might recall a jolly fellow who loved joking with colleagues while others would think of a stern disciplinarian or a stickler for rules. Perhaps they recall a person who would give you anything you needed while others would consider you stingy and selfish.

            Your task is to plan a memorial service for your protagonist. Fill the service with people from all walks of life. Imagine them grouped together, sharing stories. What will they say about the protagonist? Now have the groups break up and regather with others from family or gym. What happens when mixed perceptions arise? Will there be surprises or conflicts?

            The story can be somber or sad, sweet or angry. Include dialogue so that feelings can come forth.

            Have fun with this one.

War Relationships

Fighting in a war is not the normal place where friendships are formed, but by virtue of the close quarters in which soldiers live, work, and “play” bonds form.

Sometimes these friendships last beyond the end of service. Seeing each other reminds them of all that they shared, allowing the memories to heal, to bring closure, to recall those that were lost.

War stories are a popular genre right now. Walk into any bookstore and you will quickly find a variety of tales from the different wars: WW I, WW II and Vietnam. Many of the stories are from a soldier’s point of view. Just as many are about those who stayed behind: women, children, parents and friends.

Your task is to write a war story. Even if you never served, you probably know someone who did. First do some research about the war that interests you the most. Read survivor’s accounts. Read factual accounts. Take notes.

When you feel comfortable writing, tell the story that you feel most comfortable relating. Remember to include sensory details as well as to let the intense emotions that war evinces come forth.

This won’t be an enjoyable task, depending upon your opinion about war.

Have fun with this one.

Walk into the Past

Today was a wonderful day for me. I got to relive good times in my past.

It got me to thinking that our characters can take similar walks.

What would they see? Feel? Do?

Even if you never include the information in your writing, it might allow you to see deeper into your character’s mind.

Your task is to send your character somewhere new and different, somewhere where artifacts from the past pop, up in rapid succession.

Write the scene. Mention the object in terms of the memory that it triggers.

Include as many objects as you can.

Have fun with this one.